Bombadil Publishing

Archive for July 2009

Bombadil Publishing

After enduring unquenchable blaze and violent hardihood of life in heat-scorching Delhi, some drops have restored the placidity of unquiet souls, flourished the yearning to drench in rain, and aspired the romantic hearts to unite. It seems soft gentlest pleasures are whispering around after redemption from cruelest and seductive Sun. Peaceful environment has settled on all creatures’ life. Rain has always played a prominent and recurrent role in the mighty pen of authors’ and poets’ rendering nobility of thoughts and majesty of life. I am no exception to it–a mysteriously daunting spirit of roasting heat of sun that handsomely sucked my humanly livelihood and left with barred heart, rain has refurbished once again my energetic soul to be enmeshed in freeing my long-suppressed feelings. Seeing all children are enjoying the shimmering drops adoringly rolling down their diminutive body, my dream and desire leapt up to catch the moments and frame them in mighty words. Extreme frequency of power cuts that snatched the serenity of Delhities, is overshadowed by the law of nature.

A young writer from El Salvador; Mario, emigrated to Canada several years ago, wehere he started a book of short stories,and when our young writer finished his book he was contacted by another young writer in Mexico, this young lady, Lauri, who told Mario about Bombadil Publishing. Mario sent the manuscript to our international office in Sweden, and I, Melvin the Latin-American Editor in Bombadil Publishing, sent Mario´s book to our mentor in Peru, Maggy, and Maggy will send back to us this book, this week, when she, in according with Mario, is finished reading the book as a mentor and as proofreading.

It’s amazing and amusing? Of course it is. The amazing thing is the flying Mario´s book took, I mean, flying from El Salvador to Canada in Mario´s mind and the book flew to Mexico to Lauri, and our book continued to travel and flew to Sweden and then to Peru, then back to Sweden again, there is an amazing flying. It was amusing that our mentor, Maggy in Peru, doesn’t understand so of the book much because Mario wrote in the special way people from El Salvador use to speak Spanish. And I was laughing because I am from El Salvador and I totally understood what Mario wrote. I told Mario that we needed to change the language a little to express the book in an international Spanish, again that was funny and amusing because we people from El Salvador speak a special Spanish, but at the same time we speak “real” Spanish too, and Mario and my self smiled, we smiled a Bombadil’s smile, a global smile, as many young writers around the world, whom are writing at this very moment a Bombadil book. We in Bombadil Publishing are flying and flying around the world. Would you like fly with us?

Melvin González

As a Bombadilian, my interactions with diverse young authors shove me deep into numerous precious questions and “What makes a good writer?” is one of them.
Today, intellectually, youth are more mature than their age, no doubt. The impact of internet is palpable on their broader vision. What amazes me is that they take criticism positively and are quite flexible for desired changes. As far as the above mentioned question is concerned, my humble advice would be:
Writing remains a raw material or rough elements – a conglomeration of lifeless words or phrases until a writer, through aesthetic voice, pours ‘soul’ into it. It is the craftsmanship to create a real world where readers can walk through and experience the events as if they were real.
Some technical aspects such as precise planning, style or language, knowledge and clear vision of the subject are the basic instruments for further succession of proceeding rationally and logically. In order to become a good writer, one needs to keep their senses active and observe each moment and event they come across. It helps accumulate basic ingredients and then a writer polishes them with their best possible skills.
There is no short cut and no time limit for making a good writer. It has to be practiced on a regular basis. Reading books written by some famous writers, discussing your writing with friends, family members, and receiving expert advice from mentors will certainly help a lot.
At the end, I’d like to remember a famous quote of Richard Wright, “I would hurl words into this darkness and wait for an echo, and if an echo sounded, no matter how faintly, I would send other words to tell, to march, to fight, to create a sense of hunger for life that gnaws in us all.”
writer
As a Bombadilian, my interactions with diverse young authors shove me deep into numerous precious questions and “What makes a good writer?” is one of them.
Today, intellectually, youth are more mature than their age, no doubt. The impact of internet is palpable on their broader vision. What amazes me is that they take criticism positively and are quite flexible for desired changes. As far as the above mentioned question is concerned, my humble advice would be:
Writing remains a raw material or rough elements – a conglomeration of lifeless words or phrases until a writer, through aesthetic voice, pours ‘soul’ into it. It is the craftsmanship to create a real world where readers can walk through and experience the events as if they were real.
Some technical aspects such as precise planning, style or language, knowledge and clear vision of the subject are the basic instruments for further succession of proceeding rationally and logically. In order to become a good writer, one needs to keep their senses active and observe each moment and event they come across. It helps accumulate basic ingredients and then a writer polishes them with their best possible skills.
There is no short cut and no time limit for making a good writer. It has to be practiced on a regular basis. Reading books written by some famous writers, discussing your writing with friends, family members, and receiving expert advice from mentors will certainly help a lot.
At the end, I’d like to remember a famous quote of Richard Wright, “I would hurl words into this darkness and wait for an echo, and if an echo sounded, no matter how faintly, I would send other words to tell, to march, to fight, to create a sense of hunger for life that gnaws in us all.”
Alex